Family Game Night

The Family Game Night program is a collaboration between the Cranston Public Schools Family Center and the Cranston Public Library for children in grades K-3 and their families. At this free program, library staff use literature to discuss themes like winning and losing, turning off the TV (and computer!), and using your imagination. Participants have the opportunity to play games of all kinds, from favorites like Bingo and Charades, to original game show-style experiences. The program encourages kids to develop teamwork, problem-solving, and communication skills, and to take advantage of free library services, like borrowing books and movies, and using library computers.


Week Four: Making Your Own Games

We discussed: how all games have ups and downs and taking turns, just like life!

We read: Six Hogs on a Scooter by Eileen Spinelli, That's Good! That's Bad! by Margery Cuyler

    

We played:

Snakes and Ladders using this online version as an example ... and we made our own board games!

    

You may also enjoy: Making your own DIY board games!


Week Three: Going Screen Free!

We discussed: why you should limit screen time and how you can make up your own games.

We read: Todd's TV by James Proimos, If You Give a Mouse an iphone by Ann Droyd.

    

We played:

Gameshow style trivia using this presentation (online version does not have audio and typing functions).

Pencil and paper games like Capture (also called Dots and Boxes or Dot Dash), Tic-Tac-Toe, and Snowman.

You may also enjoy:

playing other, more complex pencil and paper games, like Paper Soccer, Battleship, and Jotto.


Week Two: Winning and Losing

We discussed: the good and bad aspects of competition, how to be a "good sport."

We read: Me First by Max Kornell, Tell Me the Day Backwards by Albert Lamb.

    

We played:

Memory (also called Concentration) using this website (easier) and this website (harder!)

    

Spoons using a regular deck of cards and these rules.

You may also enjoy:

Reading these books about winning, losing, and being fair: I'm the Best by Lucy Cousins, Koala Lou by Mem Fox, Unicorn Thinks He's Pretty Great by Bob Shea, I'm the Biggest Thing in the Ocean by Kevin Sherry, and Equal Shmequal by Victoria Kroll.


Week One: Playing by the Rules

We discussed: different kinds of games, our favorite games, why games have rules.

We read: Blackout by John Rocco, Jumanji by Chris Van Allsburg.

    

We played:

Bingo using these Bingo cards and this Bingo caller.

   

Pictionary using these rules, these cards, and this timer. (If you don't want to come up with your own words, you could also use this site.)

    

You may also enjoy:

Making your own Bingo cards with words instead of numbers! You could use "sight words" for a child who is learning to read or vocabulary or spelling words for older children.

 

GAME RULES

Pictionary Rules: Two Teams

  1. Brainstorm a list of words and write them on cards. (It’s more challenging if you don’t tell each other what words you chose!)
  2. Divide into two teams. On each team, you need at least one person to draw and one person to guess.
  3. The first person to draw chooses a card and the timer is flipped over. The person must get the rest of their team to guess the word by drawing before the timer runs out.  The person drawing may not talk or write numbers or letters.
  4. If the rest of the team guesses before the time runs out, the first team gets a point. If the time runs out before anyone guesses, no one gets a point.
  5. Next the other team gets a turn. Repeat steps 3-4.
  6. The team with the most points wins!

 

Pictionary Rules: One Team

  1. Brainstorm a list of words and write them on cards. (It’s more challenging if you don’t tell each other what words you chose!)
  2. Choose a number of points you want to earn to finish the game.
  3. The first person to draw chooses a card and the timer is flipped over. The person must get the rest of the group to guess the word by drawing before the timer runs out.  The person drawing may not talk or write numbers or letters.
  4. If the rest of the group guesses before the time runs out, everyone gets a point. If the time runs out before anyone guesses, no one gets a point.
  5. Next another person draws. 
  6. When you get to the number of points you chose in step 2, everyone wins!

 

Deck of Cards Directions

  1. Have an adult shuffle the deck.
  2. Each kid should take part of the deck and make piles for each suit.
  3. Each kid should take a pile of cards and put them in order using the Ace as 1 and the jack, queen, and king as 11, 12, & 13.
  4. Now shuffle the cards together and make a pile for each number or face card.
  5. Choose 2 cards each from 8 of the piles (16 cards).  Put the rest of the cards aside and lay the 16 cards face down.
  6. Play Memory!

 

Memory Rules

  1. Lay all the cards face down.
  2. Each person takes a turn flipping two cards over.  If the cards match, they take those two cards and flip two more cards over.  If the cards do not match, they flip them face down again and the next person takes a turn.
  3. When all the cards have been paired up and removed from the middle, each person counts the cards they have taken.  The person with the most cards wins.

 

Spoons Rules

  1. Count how many people are playing and put one fewer spoons in the middle of the table.
  2. Deal four cards to each player.
  3. The rest of the deck should be placed in the middle of the table (face-down) and the top card should be flipped over to make a second pile (face-up).
  4. Each player takes a turn, choosing the top card from either pile and then discarding one card from his or her hand on the face-up pile.
  5. When one player is holding four cards with the same number or face, he or she casually takes a spoon from the middle.
  6. As soon as one spoon is taken, everyone tries to grab one, and the person who does not get a spoon loses.


 Capture Rules

  1. Draw a grid of dots on a piece of paper.
  2. Each player takes a turn connecting two dots. (The dots must be next to each other and connected with a straight line.)
  3. When the line a player draws creates a box, the player write his or her initial in the box. 
  4. When all possible lines are drawn, count the initials in boxes.  The person who has "captured" the most boxes wins.

 

Snowman Rules

  1. One person is the gamemaster.  The gamemaster chooses a secret word (or phrase) and writes a blank for each letter in the secret word on a piece of paper.  For example, if the secret word is "library card," the gamemaster would write "__ __ __ __ __ __ __     __ __ __ __."
  2. Another player guesses a letter and writes it down.
  3. If the letter is in the secret word, the gamemaster writes the letter in the correct blanks.  If the letter is not in the secret word, the gamemaster draws the first part of the snowman.
  4. The other players keep guessing letters.  Every time the players guess a letter that is not in the secret word, the gamemaster draws another part of the snowman (up to 9 parts: 3 circles, 2 arms, 1 pair of eyes, 1 mouth, 1 carrot nose, 1 top hat).
  5. If a player guesses the secret word before the snowman is complete, he or she wins. If the gamemaster draws the whole snowman before anyone guesses, the gamemaster wins.

 

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